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Full Dome Lumophore

03.11.15 | Comment?

Lumophore, as documented in full-dome format, at Plums Festival of audio-visual culture which took place in Moscow, November 2014.

LumophoreLumophore – Plums Festival, Moscow

LumophoreLumophore – Plums Festival, Moscow

LumophoreLumophore – Plums Festival, Moscow

LumophoreLumophore – Plums Festival, Moscow

Here is a fragment of an interview I gave with Marina Antsiperova about the piece:

While working on this video piece did you think in any way about Russian audience or “Russian cosmic research”?

For many years I have been interested in the Russian Avant Garde especially during the dynamic and highly experimental decade of the 1920s. I’ve been immersed in surveying its music, visual art and its architecture from an aesthetic and philosophical viewpoint alongside its utopian ideals. Recently I discovered Andrey Smirnov’s book ‘Sound in Z – Experiments in Sound and Electronic Music in Early 20th Century Russia’. The book explores the earliest examples of sound synthesis, graphical and ornamental sound, psychoacoustics, noise machines, electroacoustics and visual music. Since my audio-visual performance work is specifically involved in exploring the ‘cross-wiring’ of sound, space and form to create complex and precise time-based geometric narratives, this book was of great interest to me. I would imagine the influence of artistic movements on my work may well have some resonance with Russian audiences.

Lumophore video edit

I know that you are fond of soviet architecture. Did you see Kaluga planetarium building, what you think about it?

I am a huge fan of Soviet architecture, especially those that arose from architects involved in the Constructivist and Suprematist movements such as Chernikov, Melnikov and Leonidov. The Kaluga planetarium building looks equally stunning, and although built much later (completed in 1967) it appears to have been influenced by the aforementioned architectural style. It’s also notable that the complete structure of the State Space Exploration Museum, in which the Kaluga Planetarium is home to, appears to take the form of concatenated parts of a spacecraft or rocket.

Stills of the piece can be found here

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